Free Willy FB campaign 'Save the World’s Saddest Dolphins'!!

Facebook, "Save the World’s Saddest Dolphins"


Resorts World Sentosa (RWS) sent in a reply to The Straits Times Forum 'expressing its commitment to animal welfare. 'On the two dolphins bought by RWS that died in Langkawi last October from a bacterial infection Ms Boo said that RWS does not 'take death, or even illnesses, of our animals lightly.'

I am undecided. On one hand, I'm sincerely impressed at the Facebook campaign, 'Save the World's Saddest Dolphins'. From its info page: 25 bottlenose dolphins that once roamed free and wild in the vast Pacific Ocean, are now facing a life of captivity, boredom, stress, claustrophobia, frustration and slow death, thanks to Resorts World, which plans to keep them in its spa at Sentosa, Singapore. Two of their family have already died during the ordeal. Please help save these remaining animals. (More info on the campaign, pls refer to its official website, 'World's Saddest Dolphins'.)

On the other hand, I truly believe RWS will take a very good care to the dolphins (Hey, two dead dolphins already make such a ruckus, so let's do our best, shall we?)

I too am influenced by this graphic novel titled, "Pride of Baghdad". It's about the brief freedom experienced by a small pride of captive lions, who escape from Baghdad Zoo during the 2003 invasion of Baghdad by the U.S.-led coalition. I do recall one of the lionness saying that she prefers the security of the zoo to the cruel freedom of wilderness.

Well, it's just a fiction, you'd say.

True.

But who are we to say which is better to the animals?

The following 2 YouTube clips might have enlightened you more about the plight of the captived marine mammals. Free Willy, now, dammit!!




IN RESPONSE to a Sunday Times article last week (May 29), Resorts World Sentosa (RWS) sent in a reply to The Straits Times Forum 'expressing its commitment to animal welfare.'

The article in question was an appeal from animal activist Ric O'Barry, better known for his documentary The Cove which exposed the dolphin trade in Japan. Mr O'Barry had asked that the dolphins be released into the wild and offered his services in ensuring a smooth transition back to their natural habitat.

The email defended RWS' decision to showcase the remaining 25 wild-caught dolphins as one of the attractions at its Marine Life Park slated to open by end 2011, following the deaths of two dolphins last year.

'Established parks are an important generator of long-term, structured and sustained efforts to advance marine mammal science, which range from field research and water quality studies, to reproduction and physiology, as well as rescue rehabilitation. The Marine Life Park is designed to exceed international standards for animal care and welfare, and is working towards international accreditation in those areas,' wrote Ms Krist Boo, RWS's head of communications.

On the two dolphins bought by RWS that died in Langkawi last October from a bacterial infection Ms Boo said that RWS does not 'take death, or even illnesses, of our animals lightly.'

'We were deeply saddened by the loss of two dolphins to a water and air-borne bacterial infection last year. No medical expense or effort was spared but we could not save them,' added Ms Boo.

From Straits Times, "RWS: Marine parks contribute to conservation".

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