Dr Lim Hock Siew: "...that there is judgement, there is justice".


"Did he say 'Justice'?"
"No. Just us."


(Hah! Can't resist to include that cute quote from "Yong Vui Kong: dead man waiting". Okay, they're not related issues.)

Dr Lim Hock Siew has recently made to the news about how his film (well, actually the film titled "Dr Lim Hock Siew" was by a filmmaker Martyn See Tong Ming, not by Dr Lim himself) was banned.

A quick check on the Net revealed that the 79-year-old Dr Lim Hock Siew was one of at least 111 anti-government left-wing activists who were arrested and detained under what is known as Operation Coldstore on 02 Feb 1963.

There was even a YouTube clip titled, "Ex-political prisoner speaks out in Singapore". It's said that Dr Lim Hock Siew was the 2nd longest-held political prisoner (He's released in 1982 and no, I have no idea who the 1st longest-held political prisoner was?!) The video has him making the his first post-detention speech during a book launch on 14 Nov 2009--which was nicely coincident to the arrival of US President Barack Obama in Singapore for APEC Summit.

The clip was posted on 15 Nov 2009 and so far has gathered only 44,616 views. In the end of the video it is said that it was shot and subtitled by Martyn See. I am not sure if this clip is the same film, "Dr Lim Hock Siew" which is reported to be banned. No, it may not be as the YouTube clip is merely about 22 minutes. It's hardly considered a film, is it?

The same YouTube clip was incidentally also featured in a popular Tan Kin Lian's Blog, "Dr. Lim Hock Siew speaks out" on 19 Nov 2009. Makes me wonder what the hell I blogged about during those Nov days???



While I do strongly disagree with what Dr Lim Hock Siew stated in the clip, I truly feel sorry about how tired he sounded & how fragile he seemed to be. If I ever live to 79, I just want to finally be at peace with myself & not to recall with bitterness about the painful past: whether I was right (or wrong), I should be wise enough to be able to forgive others (or my self).

Censors have banned the film "Dr Lim Hock Siew" by filmmaker Martyn See Tong Ming, with effect from July 14 under the Films Act, saying it is against 'public interest'.

A statement from the Information, Communications and the Arts Ministry said the film "gives a distorted and misleading portrayal of Dr Lim's arrests and detention under the Internal Security Act (ISA) in 1963."

It added that the government "will not allow individuals who have posed a security threat to Singapore's interests in the past, to use media platforms such as films to make baseless accusations against the authorities."

Neither will it allow such individuals to use films to give a false portrayal to exculpate their guilt, or undermine public confidence in the government.

The film, banned from July 14, has also not been granted a certificate for its exhibition.

Under the Films Act, possession and distribution of a prohibited film is an offence.

An offender is liable on conviction to a fine not exceeding $10,000 or to imprisonment for a term not exceeding two years, or both.

Last September, censors passed "Singapore Rebel," a film by the same filmmaker which features opposition figure Chee Soon Juan.

It passed with an M18 rating - four years after it was banned.

It became the first political film to make the cut after the Films Act was amended in March to relax the rules on such films.

From Channel NewsAsia, "Censors ban Martyn See's film on Dr Lim Hock Siew".



Update on 13/07: The latest news has mentioned that the film was also posted in YouTube (kind of wondering whether the earlier mention YouTube clip above was the very same with that mentioned in the following Today article). Straits Times also mentioned that the ban on the film will take effect on Wed (that is tomorrow, 14/07).

I guess the only way to tell whether the YouTube clip titled, "Ex-political prisoner speaks out in Singapore" is exactly the banned film is by checking whether the URL will still be valid tomorrow.

If the link is broken, the clip is indeed the banned film & thus whoever posted it on the YouTube would have taken it down (lest he/she accused to commit the offence of distributing the video.)

Let's see tomorrow... [Update on 14/07: okay, the URL only leads to www.youtube.com, ergo the clip is truly the banned film supposedly titled, "Dr Lim Hock Siew".]

The Government has banned the film Dr Lim Hock Siew by film-maker Martyn See, saying it was against "public interest" and "gives a distorted and misleading portrayal of Dr Lim's arrests and detention under the Internal Security Act in 1963".

A statement from the Ministry of Information, Communications and the Arts said the Government "will not allow individuals who have posed a security threat to Singapore's interests in the past to use media platforms such as films to make baseless accusations against the authorities".

Neither will such individuals be allowed to use films to give a false portrayal to exonerate themselves.

The decision comes after another See film, Singapore Rebel, was passed last September, four years after it was banned. Featuring opposition figure Chee Soon Juan, it was given an M18 rating - the first political film to make the cut after the rules on such films were relaxed.

Mr See told MediaCorp yesterday he had expected his new film, which features Dr Lim's speech at a book launch last November, to get the green light as Dr Lim had been interviewed by The Straits Times and the book, Fajar Generation, had been permitted for sale here. The book tells of the struggles in the 1950s and 1960s of the University of Malaya Socialist Club, of which Dr Lim was a member.

Mr See said he had also been asked to remove the YouTube video of the film, which he is "considering".

From Today, "Martyn See film banned".

THE Government has banned a video recording of a speech made by former political detainee Lim Hock Siew, because it is against public interest.

The video by filmmaker Martyn See, 41, gives a 'distorted and misleading portrayal' of Dr Lim's arrests and detention under the Internal Security Act in 1963, said the Ministry of Information, Communication and the Arts (Mica) in a statement on Monday.

Mica added: 'The Singapore Government will not allow individuals who have posed a security threat to Singapore's interests in the past, to use media platforms such as films to make baseless accusations against the authorities, give a false portrayal of their previous activities in order to exculpate their guilt, and undermine public confidence in the Government in the process.'

The prohibition of the film means it will be an offence for anyone to distribute the video, titled Dr Lim Hock Siew, or possess a copy of it.

And it takes effect on Wednesday.

Anyone who commits the offence can be fined up to $10,000 or jailed for a maximum term of two years, or given both sentences.

From Straits Times, "Ban on video recording".

0 comments:

Post a Comment

Blog Archive